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Will GLES 3.0 be deprecated in Godot 4?

SIsilicon28SIsilicon28 Posts: 693Moderator
edited November 2019 in General Chat

With the Vulkan backend development going underway, I was wondering what they're planning on doing with the GLES 3 backend. I'm hoping they still keep it because my GPU does not support vulkan, and it would suck a lot to drop to GLES 2 because of that.

Best Answer

  • TwistedTwiglegTwistedTwigleg Posts: 2,561
    edited November 2019 Accepted Answer

    I don't know for sure, but I believe the plan for Godot 4.1 is to support Vulkan for most platforms, and OpenGL ES 2 for more resource limited platforms.

    According to the initial plans back in 2018, there will be support for OpenGL ES 3.0, OpenGL ES 2.0, and Vulkan until Vuklan support is ready, and then OpenGL ES 3 may be deprecated and removed.

    For a while, we will then offer three backends to choose from: OpenGL ES 2.0, OpenGL ES 3.0, and Vulkan (the default, when ready). Once the Vulkan backend is well tested and proven to fulfill everything we need it to, the OpenGL ES 3.0 backend might be deprecated and replaced.

    That said, I'm not sure if plans have changed since then. Personally I hope they keep OpenGL ES 3.0 around for awhile, as my GPU just barely supports Vulkan.

Answers

  • FixThatFoxFixThatFox Posts: 5Member

    I don't know for sure, but making a Vulkan-only engine is pretty daring, since it will exclude a lot of end-users. And this news article seems to imply that there will be a continuing support for OpenGL. So, that'll be a reserved "no".

  • SIsilicon28SIsilicon28 Posts: 693Moderator

    Thank you for your answer, but I think I'll wait for one that's a little more,
    Mmmmmmmmmm
    definite.

  • TwistedTwiglegTwistedTwigleg Posts: 2,561Admin
    edited November 2019 Accepted Answer

    I don't know for sure, but I believe the plan for Godot 4.1 is to support Vulkan for most platforms, and OpenGL ES 2 for more resource limited platforms.

    According to the initial plans back in 2018, there will be support for OpenGL ES 3.0, OpenGL ES 2.0, and Vulkan until Vuklan support is ready, and then OpenGL ES 3 may be deprecated and removed.

    For a while, we will then offer three backends to choose from: OpenGL ES 2.0, OpenGL ES 3.0, and Vulkan (the default, when ready). Once the Vulkan backend is well tested and proven to fulfill everything we need it to, the OpenGL ES 3.0 backend might be deprecated and replaced.

    That said, I'm not sure if plans have changed since then. Personally I hope they keep OpenGL ES 3.0 around for awhile, as my GPU just barely supports Vulkan.

  • MegalomaniakMegalomaniak Posts: 2,580Admin

    GLES 2 will still be there, but from what I understand GLES 3 renderer will be removed, not just deprecated. I could be mistaken though.

  • NeoDNeoD Posts: 179Member

    @SIsilicon28 said:
    With the Vulkan backend development going underway, I was wondering what they're planning on doing with the GLES 3 backend. I'm hoping they still keep it because my GPU does not support vulkan, and it would suck a lot to drop to GLES 2 because of that.

    Is you game needs features that Godot GLES 2 doesn't provide ?

  • SIsilicon28SIsilicon28 Posts: 693Moderator
    edited November 2019

    @NeoD said:

    @SIsilicon28 said:
    With the Vulkan backend development going underway, I was wondering what they're planning on doing with the GLES 3 backend. I'm hoping they still keep it because my GPU does not support vulkan, and it would suck a lot to drop to GLES 2 because of that.

    Is you game needs features that Godot GLES 2 doesn't provide ?

    I have, and will have projects where I need GLES 3 for features such as HDR rendering and certain shader features like derivatives. My GPU does support OpenGL 4, but no compute shaders. :P But I'm ok with that. I'm always trying to find ways to do things that normally use compute shaders. For example, it's possible to implement forward clustered rendering without compute shaders. Just set up the lighting data on the CPU end, and pass the data to the shaders via a buffer texture or something. I mean GLES 3.0 introduced transform feedbacks, which is required for Godot's GPU based particles. Now I'd be okay with using the CPU variant, if they even allow you to modify the particles by code! You might as well just implement your own particle system.

    I hope this didn't sound like a rant. I did not intend for it to sound like that.

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